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The University of Cincinnati College of Law recognizes that the practice of law often involves an intersection with other disciplines.  If you have your eye on a career that will be enhanced by a strong background in law plus another academic field, a joint degree program may be right for you.  The following joint degree programs allow students to complete the JD and the Master’s Degree in just 4 years—a feat that usually requires 5 years if pursued in the traditional, consecutive manner. 

In the first year of law school, students may also create a custom, individualized program with other graduate degree programs in areas of interest to them.  

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The University of Cincinnati College of Law welcomes students into the JD program who have earned their undergraduate degrees from institutions outside the U.S. and Canada. The JD degree is required in order to practice law in the United States and will allow graduates to sit for the bar exam in any state.

Admission Requirements

With a few exceptions, the process for international JD students is the same as for domestic students (see Admission Requirements). All applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). You will be required to submit an application form, personal statement, two letters of recommendation, and official transcripts for each undergraduate or graduate college or university attended.

Transcripts

Applicants who earned their undergraduate degree outside the United States or Canada must have their transcripts submitted through the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) Credential Assembly Service. If applicants completed any post-secondary work outside the US (including its territories) or Canada, they must use this service for the evaluation of international transcripts.

An International Credential Evaluation will be completed by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), which then will be incorporated into the applicant's Credential Assembly Service report.

Internationally educated JD applicants must register through the LSAC website. Questions can be directed to LSAC at 215-968-1001or to LSACinfo@LSAC.org.

English Language Proficiency

All applicants whose first language is not English are required to take either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam. Applicants must have their TOEFL or IELTS score sent to the Law School Admission Council (LSAC). LSAC’s TOEFL code for the Credential Assembly Service is 0058. The applicant’s score will then be included in the International Credential Evaluation document that will be included in the Credential Assembly Service Law School Report.

If you require additional English language preparation before attending law school, UC International can assist you with resources to improve your English proficiency.

Visas

International JD students will need to obtain an F-1 student visa. As part of the application process, you will be required to submit a Financial Affidavit of Support that shows that you have sufficient funding to cover your costs and living expenses during your first year of law school. Our Admissions office and the UC International office can discuss the visa application process and its requirements in more detail with you.

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Judge in Residence 2014: Hon. Christine Durham and Professor Marianna Bettman
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Even as we find new ways to connect via technology, we believe our students and alums benefit from listening to engaging speakers and interacting with them on a personal basis. To learn face to face from some of the most distinguished legal minds in the country.

Whether it is to expand your classroom knowledge or to fulfill your continuing legal education requirements, we provide innumerable opportunities for UC Law students and alums to come together to learn and to explore differing points of view.

  • The Constitution Day Lecture recognizes this federal observance day with programs and speakers that discuss the importance of our United States Constitution.
  • The William Howard Taft Lecture on Constitutional Law brings some of the most important and influential scholars in the field To the University of Cincinnati to discuss important constitutional issues of the day.
  • The Robert S. Marx Lecture was established by Judge Robert S. Marx to bring eminent scholars in various fields of law to the College of Law.
  • UC Law's Judge-in-Residence Program invites renowned judges to spend several days at the law school to attend classes and talk with students.
  • Each year, a legal scholar of national and international prominence is invited to the College of Law as our Chesley Distinguished Visiting Professor to teach a class and deliver a public lecture.
  • The Harris Distinguished Visitors series brings outstanding practitioners to the law school to talk with students about professionalism, leadership, and their distinguished careers.
  • The Harold C. Schott Lecture recognizes the outstanding scholarly achievement of UC College of Law faculty with a public lecture on their work.
  • The John H. Burlingame Distinguished Lecture brought nationally and internationally recognized speakers, such as Richard Susskind, Dan Abrams, and Jeffrey Toobin, to Cincinnati to address important contemporary issues.
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Students who wish to learn about law or prepare for a bar exam but who do not have time to invest in the J.D. or LL.M. degrees should consider pursuing a graduate certificate program in law. Each of these programs can be completed in one semester. The UC College of Law has certificate programs available for

  • non-lawyers who work in fields where legal knowledge would enhance their occupational success and satisfaction;
  • graduate students in other disciplines;
  • lawyers who would like to gain additional knowledge and skills to enhance their legal practices; and
  • foreign-trained lawyers.

Students interested in any of the certificate programs described below should contact: Staci Rucker, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, Student Affairs and Diversity at staci.rucker@uc.edu or at 513-556-0065.

Certificate in Legal Studies

This certificate program is available to anyone with an undergraduate degree interested in studying law. This program would be of interest to professionals in fields for which legal knowledge would benefit them, students in other UC graduate programs, and lawyers wishing to obtain new skills and knowledge. Many non-lawyers work in fields where legal knowledge would enhance their occupational success and satisfaction. Human resource professionals deal with employment and labor law on a daily basis. Journalists need to understand their legal rights and the limits of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Business professionals increasingly benefit from knowledge of laws related to business entities, legal compliance, intellectual property, employment, tax, and other topics. Health care workers benefit from knowledge of health and drug regulation and reimbursement systems. Criminal justice workers benefit from knowledge of criminal law and procedure. Many other professions could be added to this list. Students in other UC graduate programs would benefit by increasing their knowledge in law. This could include students in engineering, pharmacology, architecture, business, design, political science, social work, race, gender, and sexuality studies and many others. Other students may be lawyers who would like to gain new knowledge and skills to enhance their legal practices. A lawyer who would like to add criminal law as a new component of her law practice may be interested in the program. A lawyer who left the practice of law temporarily to raise children may wish to refresh legal skills and knowledge. Students earn at least 12 credit hours (and up to 18 credits), consisting of two core courses (4 credits) and 3 or 4 elective courses (8 or more credits). The required courses are:

  • Intro to Law. This 1-credit course provides students with a common grounding in basic legal concepts, historical context, legal institutions, and the language of law and legal reasoning. The course will also familiarize students with how to prepare for and participate in courses at the College of Law.
  • The U.S. Legal System. This 3-credit course helps students gain an understanding of the critical features of the U.S. legal tradition, the functional components and participants in our legal system, and key legal concepts from various fields of law.

These required classes may be waived for practicing attorneys for whom these basic courses would not be beneficial. Students will select the rest of their classes from the curriculum related to the field of law of interest to them. The UC College of Law offers classes in the following areas of practice: business and entrepreneurship law; criminal law; general and small practice; intellectual property law; international law; law of health, the environment, and technology; litigation and alternative dispute resolution; and public interest law. Students who are participating in the J.D. or LL.M. programs are not eligible to participate in this certificate program. Classes taken in this program will not transfer to the UC Law's J.D. or LL.M. programs. Additional information on the requirements and application process can be found under Certificate Admissions.

Certificate in U.S. Law

This certificate is designed for foreign-trained attorneys who wish to study the U.S. legal system to better represent U.S. clients and to become more prepared to negotiate and litigate with U.S. parties. This certificate would be attractive to students who are not able to devote sufficient time and/or resources to pursue a two-semester LL.M. degree but who would benefit from studying U.S. law and living in the U.S. Students will earn at least 12 credit hours (and up to 18 credits), consisting of two core courses (4 credits) and 3 or 4 elective courses (8 or more credits). The required courses are:

  • Intro to Law. This 1-credit course provides students with a common grounding in basic legal concepts, historical context, legal institutions, and the language of law and legal reasoning. The course will also familiarize students with how to prepare for and participate in courses at the College of Law.
  • The U.S. Legal System. This 3-credit course helps students gain an understanding of the critical features of the U.S. legal tradition, the functional components and participants in our legal system, and key legal concepts from various fields of law.

Students will select the rest of their classes from the curriculum related to the field of law of interest to them. The UC College of Law offers classes in the following areas of practice: business and entrepreneurship law; criminal law; general and small practice; intellectual property law; international law; law of health, the environment, and technology; litigation and alternative dispute resolution; and public interest law. Applicants must have a law degree from a foreign university—undergraduate or graduate. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. The target grade point average is a 3.0. Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts. Additional information on the requirements and application process can be found under Certificate Admissions.

Certificate in Fundamentals of U.S. Law

This certificate program is available to foreign-trained attorneys who would like to study the fundamentals of U.S. Law in order to prepare to take a bar examination in a U.S. jurisdiction. A foreign-trained lawyer could pursue this certificate alone or could pursue it while engaged in UC Law's LL.M. program. Participating students will build fundamental skills and knowledge that will make it more likely for them to pass a bar examination and better serve their future legal clients. Students will earn at least 12 credit hours, but may earn more credits based on their particular needs. The certificate will require students to take six credits from the UC College of Law curriculum that represents fundamental courses that are frequently tested on the bar exam and include: contracts; torts; civil procedure; legal research and writing; constitutional law; criminal law; property; criminal procedure; legal ethics ; corporations; evidence; federal courts; payment systems; real estate transactions; secured transactions; wills and estates, trusts and future interests; federal income tax; agency, partnership, and unincorporated businesses; sales; administrative law; family law; and future courses that may be added of this type. For their remaining credits, students may select other fundamental courses of interest to them or other courses based on the type of legal practice they wish to pursue. The curriculum of the College includes courses in the following areas of practice: business and entrepreneurship law; criminal law; general and small practice; intellectual property law; international law; law of health, the environment, and technology; litigation and alternative dispute resolution; and public interest law. Applicants must have a law degree from a foreign university—undergraduate or graduate. Successful applicants will demonstrate that they have strong academic and/or professional backgrounds indicating that they have the skills necessary to meet the demands of participation in this program. The target grade point average is a 3.0. Students must demonstrate English proficiency to be able to fully participate in law school classes, which involve in-class dialogue about complex legal issues and substantial reading of sophisticated legal texts. Students who have been accepted in the LL.M. program and who are in good standing will be automatically eligible to participate in the certificate program. Additional information on the requirements and application process can be found under Certificate Admissions.

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A Distinctive Legal Education

The University of Cincinnati College of Law is well-known for the excellent education and unparalleled experiences it provides to its students. You will learn the law in small classes from exceptional, full-time faculty who are legal experts in their fields. Prominent Cincinnati lawyers and judges also bring real-world experience into the classrooms direct from the courtroom and the boardroom.

JD Program

UC Law's JD program builds your foundation of legal knowledge with the support of a small learning community and a faculty mentor. Your will learn to think and reason like a lawyer and understand the values and ethics of the legal profession. You can also focus your professional path in a key area such as business law or criminal law.

LLM Program

Our LLM in the U.S. Legal System provides an in-depth understanding of the U.S. legal process, as well as networking opportunities for internationally trained lawyers. Cincinnati Law LLM students are integrated into the JD classes and can also design a course of study to advance their own professional careers.

Certificate Programs

Professionals who work in fields where legal knowledge can be beneficial or foreign-trained lawyers who do not have the time to invest in a JD or LLM degree can choose a graduate certificate program that can be completed in one semester.

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Global opportunities at a premier U.S. law school

Whether you want to study law in the United States or develop your expertise in international and comparative law, Cincinnati Law offers some distinctive opportunities to global-minded students. We've compiled a comprehensive list of our opportunities viewable here in our International Dean's Report.

Internationally Trained Lawyers

Our UC Law LLM program in the U.S. Legal System prepares its graduates to better represent U.S. and non-U.S. clients and sharpens their negotiation, litigation, and transactional skills. Comparative law students are integrated into our JD classes and can tailor their studies to their professional goals. Non-U.S. law school graduates may also choose to pursue one of our UC Law graduate certificate programs for international students.

Practicing international lawyers also come to Cincinnati Law for its intensive Executive Program in International Business Law, part of the Institute for the Global Practice of Law. The IGPL also provides opportunities to network and develop professional ties with Greater Cincinnati law firms and corporations.

JD Students

Law today is increasingly global and our UC Law JD students develop the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in an international marketplace. Classroom instruction in international law and business transactions is complemented by global opportunities to study abroad or participate in summer internships in countries ranging from Botswana to China or Ireland and beyond. Through its exchange program with the University of Canterbury’s School of Law in New Zealand, UC law students also have a unique opportunity to experience the intellectual and cultural benefits of studying law abroad at one of the top 100 law schools in the world.

The UC law school's Urban Morgan Institute for Human Rights has been a leader in the education and training of human rights lawyers for over three decades and is recognized throughout the world for its many contributions in the field. Similarly, the first international innocence network conference on the global human rights issue of wrongful conviction was sponsored by UC Law's Ohio Innocence Project and held in Cincinnati.

International JD Students

Our small law school community provides many opportunities for international students in our UC Law JD program to work closely with faculty and other law students. Whether you intend to seek employment in the United States or return to your country after graduation, our JD program will help you achieve your professional goals.

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Law student externs in Washington DC
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Experience UC Law
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Law students Noah Goertemiller ’14, Lauren VanHook ’15, and Brad Dunkle ’15 spent their summer gaining experience in DC.

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We believe in learning by doing

At Cincinnati Law, our curriculum is complemented by a myriad of opportunities to develop your lawyering skills and have real-world experience. In the classroom, law simulations help students develop the necessary litigation, negotiation, mediation, and transactional skills. UC law school students may then further practice those skills and earn academic credit through our clinic programs, externships, moot court and trial practice competitions, or journal experiences.

Fellowship and Internship Experiences at UC Law

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Welcome to the University of Cincinnati College of Law – the nation’s premier, small, urban, public law school. As the country’s fourth oldest continuously operating law school, we develop legal professionals ready to assume leadership roles in the global marketplace.

The UC Law School Experience

Outside of the classroom, UC Law students gain real-world experience in our numerous centers, clinics, and institutes, plus through our many externship and fellowship opportunities – some that even begin in the first year of the JD program. Networking opportunities also abound including employer roundtables, information fairs, on-campus interviewing opportunities, speed chats, and Catalyst, a “micro-mentoring” program.

UC Law School Opportunities

The Greater Cincinnati metropolitan area is home to 2 million people, over 800 law firms, and serves as headquarters for ten Fortune 500 companies. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and U.S. District Court for Southern District of Ohio are both located in downtown Cincinnati, a mere two miles from the law school.

 

Support

Nestled within a large public research university of over 40,000 students, you will find a small law school community of less than 400 students with an enviable 8.4 to 1 student-faculty ratio and first year sections that are among the smallest in the nation. UC Law faculty and staff are eager to provide personal attention, while new classmates quickly form community to support each other’s success.

Value

With approximately $2 million awarded annually in scholarships, consistently high bar passage results, and below average student loan debt figures, a Cincinnati Law degree provides a solid return on investment. In addition, Forbes ranked Cincinnati as one of America’s “Best Bargain Cities” and as one of the most affordable places to live well. Students from other states also have an opportunity to participate in the Graduate Metropolitan Rate or reclassify for Ohio residency.

 

The University of Cincinnati is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for all members of the UC community. Our Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is available on the Department of Public Safety’s website at www.uc.edu/publicsafety. To receive a hard copy of the report, call 513-556-4900.

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Remington Jackson ’15 at externship with attorneys from Cummins & Brown LLC.

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Our UC Law JD program prepares students to enter diverse professional settings all over the world. Most UC law school graduates serve in a legal capacity, such as a counselor, litigator, negotiator, drafter, advocate, and decision-maker. Others work in business management, consulting, media, politics, teaching, and areas where having a law degree helps them be better at what they do.

Our UC Law JD degree program strives to prepare students to be COMPLETE PROFESSIONALS who know the law and possess the skills necessary to practice law. It also prepares students to be professionals with the leadership and communications skills required to be successful. AT UC Law you will THINK about law, DO lawyering tasks, and learn what it means to BE an ethical and fulfilled professional.

THINK Learn the law from our award-winning UC law school faculty in small classes. All UC Law first-year students take a curriculum aimed at introducing foundational legal knowledge. Upper-level JD students have the opportunity to select most of their classes in areas of professional interest to them. UC law school students build the breadth of knowledge necessary to handle complex problems for their clients. They also have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge in areas where their passions and interests lead them.

UC law school students can elect to follow professional pathways in the following areas: Business and Entrepreneurship Law; Criminal Law; Innovation, Technology, and Intellectual Property; Science, Health, and Environment; International; Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution; Public Interest Law, and General and Small Practice.

DO You will have many opportunities to build skills necessary in the practice of law at UC Law. Students simulate lawyering tasks in many UC law school classes, such as learn how to conduct a trial, advocate for a client in a mediation, conduct business transactions from the deal sheet to the closing, draft legal briefs and contracts, or negotiate a deal or a settlement.

UC Law JD students also have the opportunity to apply their new lawyering skills on behalf of real clients. Through UC law school externship and clinical programs, students can serve clients under the supervision of licensed attorneys in business, criminal, litigation, and nonprofit settings. UC law students have many experiences that prepare them to hit the ground running when they enter the profession. 

BE In addition to gaining the knowledge and skills necessary to be a lawyer, UC law school students develop a professional and ethical sensitivity to practice law with integrity. Successful and fulfilled professionals must also develop their interpersonal skills. Every law student is trained how to interview and counsel clients through our innovative Client Counseling program in their second year of the UC Law JD program.

Through our Center for Professional Development at UC Law, they also evaluate their own strengths and interests and develop a personal professional plan to help them find the best area of legal practice to match their interests and passions.

Exams End & Deferred Exam Day #2

May 16, 2014 8:00am

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