Menu Toggle menu

A Note from LLM Grad Natia Mezvrishvilli


Natia

Dear Professor Williams,

I hope you remember me. First of all thanks for all wonderful opportunities UC law school gave to me throughout the year. Each professor I met at the university was new experience for a student coming from different system of law and completely different system of high education.

I am writing this e-mail to express my gratitude towards school, professors, students and especially professors - Lassiter and Moore. Professor Lassiter ensured my smooth transition from Civil Law to Common Law system, inspired me by his teaching methods, friendly and professional attitude toward student who was experiencing serious difficulties in the process of learning. The assistance Professor Moore provided is immeasurable. She connected me to various professionals at Prosecutor’s Office, Public Defender’s Office and etc. which was extremely helpful for practicing lawyer.

As you are aware, Georgian criminal justice system is based on codes, thus hundreds of Supreme Court cases at the beginning of semester was the toughest thing could happen to me. However, with the assistance and almost constant encouragement of professor Lassiter, that I was able to succeed, I managed to get highest grades in the most difficult subjects, including his Criminal Procedure. We started working on a project, encompassing comparative analysis on Georgian-American Criminal Procedure. Although I could not finish it due to my heavy workload at school, I have succeeded back home with respect to teaching future lawyers. I am sharing this news being confident it might please you as a dean and representative of the law school as this particular success is mainly triggered by Professor Lassiter’s encouragement to share American experience with Georgian colleagues and impact of wonderful professors of UC law school as a whole.

I will be teaching Criminal Procedure of Georgia in two leading Georgian Universities this fall. I used to teach before coming to the UC law school, but what makes more sense now is that I will use American methods of teaching, the one I learned from Professors Lassiter, Moore, Bryant, Bilionis and others. There will be something innovative in the Syllabus of Georgian Criminal Procedure and for Georgian law students on behalf of UC law school. I am considering to pursue PHD in Constitutional Law - the area I would never imagine to step in. This interest and decision was greatly conditioned by Professor Lassiter’s advice to work on constitutional aspects of American and Georgian Criminal Procedure… and by fascinating Constitutional Law courses taught by Professors Bilionis and Bryant. Professor Moore's way of teaching made me reconsider the way my department defines criminal justice policy within the Chief Prosecutor’s Office of Georgia. I hope I can manage to establish new approaches in policy making, which will ultimately ensure the effective functioning of Georgian criminal justice system.

Hope I did not take much of your time. Thanks once again. … My gratitude belongs to school and all professors. … (The) experience and knowledge I gained in UC law school will definitely influence development of Georgian Prosecution Service and education system.

Respectfully,
Natia Mezvrishvili, LLM (‘17)
Head of the Department of Supervision Over
Prosecutorial Activities and Strategic Development
Chief Prosecutor’s Office of Georgia, Tbilisi, Gorgasali str. 24.