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JD-MBA Student William Volck Focuses on Career as In-House Counsel


William Volck ’14 has contemplated a number of legal career paths in the last two years. At first he considered sports law and becoming a sports agent. He flirted with the idea of litigation, aided in part by his summer work experience with a local judge. Now he is geared toward an eventual career in house. Regardless of where he ends up and what type of law he ultimately practices, Volck has not strayed from his initial goal as a college freshman of going to law school and working towards a JD.

Volck was born on a Navajo reservation in Northern Arizona but moved to his father’s hometown of Cincinnati at age five. After attending St. Xavier High School, Volck headed to Indiana University. He knew when he arrived at college that he was likely going to pursue a law degree, regardless of his major. Volck ultimately earned a BA in Communications from IU with a minor from the Kelley School of Business in 2011.

During his senior year at IU, Volck interned at a pair of local law offices in Bloomington, Ind. One person who was especially supportive of this decision was Volck’s uncle, a sole practitioner in Baltimore whose legal career was a primary motivation for Volck opting to pursue law in the first place.

After a tough decision, Volck opted to return home for law school, enrolling in the College of Law’s Class of 2014. In the last couple years, he has become especially interested in business law, in part due to his minor at IU, while also influenced by many of his college friends who studied business and now work in the field. As a result, he is now pursuing a joint JD/MBA. Typically, students attend a year at the College of Law while spending the second year out of four at the UC Lindner College of Business. However, Volck is taking a different route by loading up on credits this semester. He will then take a few business courses during his traditional 3L year, sit for the bar with this class, and then spend the 2014-15 year at the business school.

Externships Provide Lots of Opportunity

While Volck is currently preparing for a career as in-house counsel, his experiences last summer externing for Magistrate Judge Karen Litkovitz ’84 at the United States District Court, Southern District of Ohio, opened up his eyes to litigation. “For a 1L summer, I had a really excellent experience,” Volck said.

Throughout the summer, Volck worked with Magistrate Judge Litkovitz’s clerks – College of Law graduates Erica Faaborg '06 and Laura Ahern '85 – in helping draft various opinions before the judge made her corrections.  “(Magistrate Judge Litkovitz) has final say over absolutely everything, but I felt involved with the whole process,” Volck said.

Volck noted his 1L civil procedure and research and writing classes were especially valuable during his summer, but his research and writing skills especially improved as he was “doing it every day.”

The current 2L was appreciative of Magistrate Judge Litkovitz bringing him into settlement conferences, hearings, and other proceedings to observe and take notes. Other judges were also very welcoming, including Chief Judge Susan Dlott. At the end of the summer, Judge Michael Barrett ’77, United States District Court of the Southern District of Ohio, held a mock trial for all the judges’ externs, which allowed Volck to argue in front of Magistrate Judge Stephanie Bowman and a live jury.

“That’s when I really discovered I liked litigation,” Volck said, noting the “competitive edge” involved.

This summer, Volck will be working in New York with Bruce Eichner ’69 and The Continuum Company. Volck is the 2013 Eichner Fellow. “I’m really excited about that. I have never been to New York before,” he said, who pursued this experience for the opportunity to work with in-house counsel and gain experience in business development.

Volck is a member of the Moot Court Program and also a Tenant Information Project volunteer. Last semester, he and 3L Casey Kirchberg participated in an ABA Negotiations competition at Cooley Law School in Michigan. Professor Marjorie Aaron, director of the Center for Practice, and adjunct professor Jim Lawrence of Frost Brown Todd coached Volck and Kirchberg, as well as another pair from the College of Law.

In his free time, Volck enjoys doing outdoor activities such as hunting, hiking, and fishing. He also enjoys attending Reds games and listening to live music.

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13

From Broadcasting to Law—Alex Doyle Plans on Career as a Prosecutor


 Alex Doyle arrived on campus at UC in September 2006. Six and a half years later, she’s still here. Doyle, a native Cincinnatian, graduated with a degree in Electronic Media from the College Conservatory of Music in 2010 and, in two months, she will earn her JD from the College of Law.

“Being at UC for seven years has been the best experience possible for someone like me,” Doyle said. “I love UC and Cincinnati, and I would not have changed my time here for the world!”

Doyle grew up on the West Side and attended St. Ursula Academy, where she excelled both in the classroom and in the swimming pool. Doyle chose to attend UC, where she was offered a swimming scholarship, although she opted for a more traditional college life after one year of swimming for UC. She joined a sorority, became the president of UC’s student television station and even interned at CNN in Atlanta, where she managed social media networking for “CNN Newsroom with Rick Sanchez.”

Doyle’s interest in law school was first piqued by an undergraduate media law course. She was passionate about media and law had always interested her, so she jumped at the opportunity to take the course. In the end, it helped lead her toward law school and, ultimately, at UC.

“I have always been a homebody and being lucky enough to have a highly ranked law school in my hometown was a great coincidence for me,” said Doyle, who complimented the Admissions staff that made her feel welcome and accepted before she even submitted her application.

When Doyle began law school, she thought about focusing on media law and possibly continuing to pursue a career as a news anchor. However, she has since fallen in love with prosecution.

“I think I have always had a mind that is geared toward prosecution, and being in a courtroom most of the day and getting to meet lots of people is something that is right up my alley,” she said.

Doyle’s working experience and a College of Law clinical experience have certainly helped in her potential pursuit of a career inside the courtroom. After working with a Northern Kentucky attorney during the summer following 1L year, Doyle spent this past summer clerking for Judge Robert P. Ruehlman of the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas.

Last semester, she enrolled in the College’s Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order Clinic. Doyle utilized a legal intern certificate to litigate in front of magistrates and judges, and advocate for victims of domestic violence. This semester, she is participating in an independent study project with Hamilton County Prosecutor David Prem, through which she has been able to research, write briefs and memoranda, and shadow the prosecutor.

“The most meaningful classes have been the practical experiences, by far,” said Doyle, who also externed last spring with UC’s Intellectual Property Office. “In my three years at UC Law, I have worked at a small firm, completed research for a professor (James O’Reilly, Volunteer Professor of Law), worked at the Hamilton County courthouse for a judge, participated in the externship program and the DV clinic, and participated in an independent study. I feel like I have had the opportunity to be introduced to almost everything offered at UC Law.”

Doyle has also been involved with various activities at the College of Law, including serving as the current vice president of the Student Bar Association.

Outside of school and studying, Doyle enjoys participating in various running and swimming events. Last spring, she ran the full Flying Pig Marathon and plans to run the half marathon this year, on May 5, with her fiancée. Last October, Doyle finished first in her age group in the Great Ohio River Swim, while she has also twice run the Disney Princess Half Marathon at Walt Disney World (wearing a pink tutu), among other events.

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13

Professor Williams Writes Editorial About Justice Scalia’s Scorn of Vote Protections


Constitutional law professor Verna Williams published an editorial in the Cincinnati Enquirer  (March 7, 2013) challenging Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s comments about voter protection under the Voting Rights Act.    

Read the editorial: Scalia Scorns Vote Protections

OIP Celebrates 2nd Victory for the David Ayers Case


Current and former Ohio Innocence Project fellows, along with staff, celebrate an additional win in the case of David Ayers, wrongly convicted of murder in 2000. Sentenced to life in prison without parole for aggravated murder, aggravated robbery, and aggravated burglary, he was exonerated in 2011. Friday, March 8, Ayers was awarded $13.2 million by a federal jury, among the top 10 ever awarded for a wrongful conviction case.

Read the Cincinnati Enquirer story: Innocence Project Client Gets $13 Million

Jean M. Blanton '04 received top state recognition


Jean M. Blanton '04EVANSVILLE, (Ind.) – Two attorneys from the practice of Ziemer, Stayman, Weitzel & Shoulders, LLP have received top Indiana honors from Indiana Super Lawyers Magazine. The magazine annually rates attorneys based on their level of professional achievement.

 

Jean M. Blanton, Partner, was recognized for the fifth consecutive year. She was named a 2013 Super Lawyer and 2013 Rising Star, an honor bestowed on only 2.5% of Super Lawyers in the state.


 

Patrick A. Shoulders, Partner, was named a 2013 Super Lawyer. This marks the tenth consecutive year Shoulders has received the honor. He has twice been named by the magazine as one of Indiana’s top 50 attorneys.

 

 

Ziemer, Stayman, Weitzel & Shoulders, LLP is a full-service law firm in Evansville, Ind., providing legal counsel to local, regional and national businesses and institutions in a broad range of industries.

 

Daniel Bennie '73, Mark Newman '89 and Charles Hinegardner '95 Named 2013 Super Lawyers


Daniel Bennie '73CINCINNATI--The law firm of Barron Peck Bennie & Schlemmer Co., L.P.A. (BPBS) is pleased to announce that Daniel M. Bennie '73, Mark L. Newman '89 and Charles L. Hinegardner '95 have been recognized as 2013 Ohio Super Lawyers. This recognition continues the tradition of Super Lawyers designation for the attorneys of BPBS.

Ohio Super Lawyers showcases outstanding lawyers in Ohio who are recognized by their peers for professional accomplishments. Only five percent of Ohio lawyers are chosen as Ohio Super Lawyers. In selecting this year’s group of honorees, candidates were evaluated on 12 indicators of peer recognition and professional achievement.

Mr. Bennie has extensive experience in the representation of real estate developers and entrepreneurs, builders, condominium and community associations, financial institutions and investors in real estate. Mr. Newman is an Ohio State Bar Association Certified Specialist in Workers’ Compensation Law. He devotes his practice to assisting injured and disabled individuals pursue workers’ compensation, social security disability, and personal injury claims. Mr. Hinegardner has been recognized as a Rising Star within Ohio Super Lawyers. Super Lawyers’ Rising Stars is a designation given to the legal industry’s best lawyers under the age of 40, as nominated by their peers.

About Barron Peck Bennie & Schlemmer, Co., L.P.A.

With offices in Oakley, Over-the-Rhine and Northern Kentucky, BPBS provides comprehensive legal services for individual and commercial clients in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky areas. For more information on BPBS’s attorneys, practice areas and specific services, visit www.bpbslaw.com or call 513-721-1350.

Talk: Environmental Context: Neighborhood Matters for Human Health and Disease


Kenneth Olden, PhD, Director of EPA’s National Center for Environmental Assessment

"Environmental Context: Neighborhood Matters for Human Health and Disease

Date: March 28, 2013

Time:  12:15 -  1:15 p.m.

Location:  Room 118

About Dr. Ken Olden

Dr. Ken Olden joined the National Center for Environmental Assessment in July 2012 with a strong legacy of promoting scientific excellence in environmental health. From 1991-2005, Olden served as the Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He made history in this role as the first African American to direct one of the National Institutes of Health. In 2005, he returned to his research position as chief of The Metastasis Group in the Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis at the NIEHS, and for academic year 2006-2007, held the position of Yerby Visiting Professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Most recently, Ken served as the Founding Dean of the School of Public Health at the Hunter College, City University of New York.

He has published extensively in peer-reviewed literature, chaired or co-chaired numerous national and international meetings, and has been an invited speaker, often a keynote, at more than 200 symposia. Dr. Olden has won a long list of honors and awards including the Presidential Distinguished Executive Rank Award, the Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award for sustained extraordinary accomplishments, the Toxicology Forum’s Distinguished Fellow Award, the HHS Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award, the American College of Toxicology’s First Distinguished Service Award, and the National Minority Health Leadership Award. Alone among institute directors, he was awarded three of the most prestigious awards in public health—the Calver Award (2002), the Sedgwick Medal (2004), and the Julius B. Richmond Award (2005). Most recently, he received the Cato T. Laurencin MD, PhD Lifetime Research Award from the National Medical Association Institute, the largest and oldest national organization representing African American physicians and their patients in the United States.

He was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences in 1994 and appointed member of the Visiting Committee for the Harvard University Board of Overseers from 2007-2010.

Dr. Olden holds the following degrees:

  • Temple University, Philadelphia, P.H.D., Cell Biology and Biochemistry, 1970. 
  • University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, M.S., Genetics. 
  • Knoxville College, B.S., Biology.

Additionally, Ken has numerous honorary degrees from several prestigious colleges and universities.

A Parisian’s View: Meet Fanny Delaunay


 Fanny Delaunay ’14 loves it in Cincinnati. The second year law student currently resides on the West Side with her husband, having also recently lived near campus, in Dayton, and in Florence, Ky. For all the moves Delaunay has made in the last five years, however, none was bigger than the one in 2008.

While Delaunay currently lives just miles from the banks of the Ohio River, this is vastly different from her hometown of Montpellier, France, a city of about 250,000 people along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. 

Delaunay was born and raised in Montpellier, which is several hours south of Paris, but just two hours from Spain and four hours from Italy. She began her college education in 2005 at Montpellier III, where she studied business and foreign languages (English, German and Chinese).  Delaunay grew especially fond of German and, as a result, opted to study at Germany’s Ruprecht Karls University for a year, at age 17.

“I worked there, I volunteered, went to school – the whole thing – and, then, there I met someone from Cincinnati,” Delaunay said. “He was an exchange student too, we were both there studying German, we were in class together.”

Delaunay began dating this American exchange student, Travis Burke, who not long after his return to the United States began classes at the College of Law in the fall of 2007. Delaunay had another year of school left, although French students only need three years to complete a bachelor’s degree, so she returned to France. Delaunay knew she wanted to come to the United States after graduation to be with Burke, but to do so she realized she would need to earn some money first.

“I got a job at the (Montpellier – Méditerranée) Airport because it was one of the only places where I could do the first shift,” she said. “I was working from 5:00 in the morning to 1:00 (p.m.), so then I took all my classes in the afternoon. I had a full-time job, 40 hours a week, and then, on top of that, I went to school full time. But I just took all my classes in the afternoon, so that I could save enough money to pay for Xavier.”

Coming to America

After completing her education in France, Delaunay obtained a one-year student visa and came to Cincinnati to be with Burke and improve her English through classes at Xavier University. Delaunay was supposed to stay for only one year, but five years later she is still here and now married to Burke, a 2010 College of Law graduate.

This was clearly a significant move for Delaunay, who not only had never been to the United States, but did not even know precisely where her future home was actually located within the country. “When I moved here, I don’t think I knew where it was on the map,” she said.

Delaunay began taking English classes at Xavier through the English as a Second Language, or ESL, program. While in this Intensive English Program, Delaunay was told her English skills were good enough and that she would benefit by taking “normal [regular] classes.” Thus, she began taking business courses, but immigration issues arose as her one year student visa was set to expire.

She and Burke were married on October 18, 2008, so Delaunay was allowed to stay in Cincinnati, but she was not initially allowed to work. A year after her husband earned his law degree from UC, Delaunay enrolled in the College of Law’s Class of 2014, after flirting with the prospect of pursuing an MBA.

Life in Cincinnati

Having recently completed her third of six semesters at the College of Law, Delaunay has enjoyed her law school career to date.

“I love it,” she said. “I think I like the second year better than the first year; just the fact you can choose your own classes makes it a little more interesting. “

Looking forward, Delaunay is not extremely interested in working at a large law firm, although the idea of working as in-house counsel is appealing to her. Delaunay also enjoyed her Federal Income Tax course in the fall semester and is considering taking more tax classes.  Last summer, Delaunay worked downtown at the Attorney General’s office, while also doing some in-house work at a printing company in Indianapolis.

When not studying or working, Delaunay enjoys trying “real U.S. food” around town.

“For example, Rookwood Pottery has the best hamburgers ever,” said Delaunay, whose review of Skyline Chili was not nearly as favorable.

While she often cooks her own French food, Delaunay does go to some of the local French restaurants, perhaps her favorite being Jean-Robert’s Table. Delaunay also enjoys painting anything – whether that is more traditional art or the upstairs of her house.

The second year law student is an only child and is hopeful that her parents also make the move from France to Cincinnati.

“They love it,” Delaunay said, noting that they go on big trips when her parents are in town, and she has now been to 28 states.

“Last year we went to the Grand Canyon,” she said. “It feels kind of like you’re in a movie. You cannot see it anywhere else.”

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13

Doug Prade Exonerated, Walked Free After 15 Years Thanks to Work of OIP


On January 29, 2013 former Akron Police Captain Douglas Prade—and a longtime OIP client—was exonerated. He walked free after 15 years in prison for the murder of his ex-wife.  DNA testing conducted by the OIP, along with additional extensive investigation over the course of a decade, proved his innocence.  Prade is the 16th person freed through the work of the OIP.

Carrie Wood was the OIP staff attorney who handled the case. Wrote Professor Mark Godsey, director of the OIP, in an email about the case, “[she] knocked it out of the park.  Carrie's dedication and talent are an inspiration to her students and clients alike, and we are lucky to have her at this law school.”  OIP was assisted by representatives from the Cleveland law firm of Jones Day as co-counsel.

Over the course of many years numerous students assisted on the case. Some are now public defenders, federal prosecutors, local prosecutors in Cincinnati, Wall Street attorneys, big firm attorneys in Cincinnati, and in-house counsel at Proctor and Gamble, to name a few.  Some of them are seasoned and very successful attorneys now, who got their first taste of the law with the OIP.  All of them played a major role in freeing Douglas Prade and keeping his hopes alive for the past decade. Most recently, 3L Jimmy Harrison, 3L Levi Daly, 2L Thomas Styslinger, and 2L Scott Leaman carried the torch for Douglas.

Media Reports on Prade Case

 

 

College of Law and the Brandery Announce Fellowship Program


The College of Law and the Brandery, a consumer marketing venture accelerator, have partnered to place law students at the company. Four rising third-year law students will work at the company this summer, assisting with a variety of legal services. Named the Brandery Fellowship Program, it is an opportunity for students to receive hands-on work experience while learning about and working with high-growth potential business start-ups.

The 15-week fellowship will begin this June. Students will help the fourth Brandery class with services including entity selection and formation, preparation of operating agreements, protecting intellectual property and other legal issues as they arise. In addition, they will have the opportunity to attend Brandery classes that address the many facets of starting a company (i.e. marketing, branding, raising capital, business models, etc.)

Students will be supervised by Professor Lew Goldfarb, director of the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic, and representatives from Taft Stettinius and Hollister law firm.

Learn about the application process, deadlines, and more.  Brandery Fellowship

What is the Brandery? The Brandery is a seed stage startup accelerator, nationally ranked as one of the top programs in the United States. They’ve made their name by focusing on the importance of consumer marketing and branding. The four-month-long program in Cincinnati, Ohio, focuses on turning great ideas into a successful, brand-driven startup. Founded in 2010, the Brandery annually select 8 – 12 companies for their program, each receiving $20,000 in seed funding, a team of mentors, world-class design assistance, and the opportunity to pitch to investors and venture capitalists at the end of the program. The benefits available to companies exceed $175,000. To ensure Cincinnati welcomes its startups, The Brandery has coordinated special deals and VIP access to events around town for their startup companies.

Cincinnati Enquirer story:  Brandery, UC law school launch partnership