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Professor Brad Mank Named Associate Dean of Academic Affairs


Cincinnati Law Dean Jennifer S. Bard announces the following leadership change: Professor Brad Mank has accepted the position of Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the college. He will assume this role over the summer. After eight years in the position, Professor Nancy Oliver will return to teaching.

Bradford Mank“I look forward to improving our curriculum and to helping communicate about the great programs we already have,” says Professor Mank. He is also excited for the opportunity to working closely with both students and faculty and continuing to teach. “My favorite part of teaching at UC is the small classes, and getting to know very intelligent students,” he shares.

Professor Mank, the James B. Helmer, Jr. Professor of Law, earned his undergraduate degree at Harvard University, graduating summa cum laude, and completed his juris doctor at Yale University, where he was also editor of the Yale Law Journal. After graduating, he clerked for Justice David M. Shea of the Connecticut Supreme Court. Before joining the Cincinnati Law faculty in 1991, Professor Mank served as an assistant attorney general for the State of Connecticut, and an associate with the law firm Murtha, Cullina, Richter, and Pinney in Hartford, Conn., with an emphasis on environmental law.

At the college, Professor Mank teaches and writes in the areas of environmental law and administrative law. A prolific scholar, he has authored many article and book chapters on environmental justice, regulatory reform, and statutory interpretation. His work is frequently cited by courts, by other scholars, and in the press. Locally, he has worked with the City of Cincinnati on numerous environmental ordinances and implementation matters, including issues such as climate change, environmental justice, recycling, and air pollution. And, he has served as chair of the Environmental Advisory Council.

Finally, Professor Mank is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Goldman Prize for Excellence in Teaching, the Harold C. Schott Scholarship Award, and the Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence, among others.

Author: Michelle Flanagan, Cincinnati Law Communication Intern

Cincinnati Law Announces Recipients of First-Ever Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence


Congratulations to Associate Dean Nancy Oliver and Professor Brad Mank, who have been awarded the first Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence, a new award created by the Office of the Provost. The award recognizes outstanding faculty members in each college who represent excellence in all its forms. Recipients will receive $2,000 in discretionary funds to be used toward their teaching or research. These faculty development awards are meant to recognize their contributions to their respective colleges and to UC, as well as support their professional efforts.

Brad Mank and Nancy Oliver

Professor Oliver is recognized for her many contributions as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Under her leadership, the law school launched the LLM Program in the US Legal System (master’s degree program for foreign-trained attorneys); the Graduate Certificate Program, which includes the Certificate in Legal Studies, the Certificate in U.S. Law, and the Certificate in the Fundamentals of U.S. Law; and the Undergraduate Certificate in Legal Studies. In addition, she has played an important role in teaching research and writing to LLM students, all of whom have first law degrees from other countries. These programs have helped Cincinnati Law to grow while also giving students greater options and opportunities.

Furthermore, Professor Oliver has been a key member in many issues related to changes in ABA Standards, including developing learning outcomes for the college, creating an assessment plan, and conducting extensive curriculum review to ensure compliance. And she worked with the Registrar’s Office as the university created the new student information portal. Her detailed involvement and devotion of time and energy demonstrate her strong advocacy for students in the law school. Professor Oliver will be returning to the faculty this summer.

Professor Brad Mank, the James B. Helmer Professor of Law, is recognized for his service and scholarship contributions to the College of Law. During the past two years, he has published, or had accepted for publication, five articles and essays, including articles in the Notre Dame Law Review and the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law. While maintaining an active scholarly agenda, Professor Mank has been instrumental in establishing the undergraduate certificate program, and chaired the Academic Policy and Curriculum (APC) Committee over several years of significant work.

Additionally, Professor Mank is a highly regarded teacher in the areas of administrative, natural resources, and environmental law. And he serves as an advisor to the Immigration and Nationality Law Review (INLR), an internationally recognized, student-run law journal. Recently Professor Mank accepted the position of Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and will be transitioning to his new role this summer.

Author: Michelle Flanagan, Cincinnati Law communication intern

Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice Receives University’s Marian Spencer Diversity Award


Cincinnati, OH—The University awarded the College of Law’s Center for Race, Gender, and Social Justice at Cincinnati Law the 2016 University of Cincinnati Marian Spencer Diversity Ambassador Award at the 8th Annual Diversity & Inclusion Conference.

Members of the Center

The Center, identified as an ambassador for diversity and inclusion, was honored for its impactful programming and efforts to prepare the next generation of attorneys to thrive in a diverse, global workforce. Co-directed by Emily Houh, Gustavus Henry Wald Professor of the Law and Contracts; Kristin Kalsem, Charles Hartsock Professor of Law; and Verna Williams, Judge Joseph P. Kinneary Professor of Law, the Center was formed six years ago.“Receiving the Spencer Award is humbling, given its namesake’s heroic efforts for social justice in Cincinnati. It inspires us to work even hard,” said Co-Director Williams.

The Center’s mission is to cultivate scholars, leaders, and activists for social change. To that end, it has three pillars: the Joint Degree JD/MA in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the first of its kind in the nation; the Freedom Center Journal, a joint scholarly publication of the College and the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which examines issues of gender, sexuality, race, and class; the Domestic Violence and Civil Protection Order Clinic, a legal laboratory where students receive extensive training in the laws surrounding domestic violence and trial advocacy, while assisting battered women and their families; and its new community-based research arm. Through these program areas, the Center has been able to make an impact on a broad and long-lasting scale. An example of their efforts was advocating for Cincinnati City Council to pass a resolution declaring freedom from domestic violence a fundamental human right, the first such resolution passed in the country. In addition, it has hosted a variety of programming exploring a range of cutting edge issues: economic justice, domestic violence, civil rights and policing, hate crimes, philanthropy and women’s movements, same-sex marriage, fair housing, and social justice feminism, among many others.

About the Award
The Marian Spencer Diversity Ambassador Award, sponsored by the university’s Diversity Council, showcases current campus affiliated individuals and groups whose diversity initiatives have positively impacted the university. Recipients must meet one of several criteria: showing an awareness for diversity, exhibiting sensitivity to people of various cultures, helping colleagues/peers grow in the area of diversity, and preparing others to thrive in a diverse, global workforce. The award was named after UC alumna and activist Marian Spencer.

OIP Receives Spirit of America Award


OIP AwardCongratulations to the Ohio Innocence Project (OIP), honored with the Donald and Marian Spencer Spirit of America Award on Tuesday, May 10, 2016. The award, which was presented by the Cincinnatus Association, recognizes the OIP’s contributions to creating greater inclusion and prompting diversity in the community.

The OIP was honored for its work in freeing more innocent people than any other state-based innocence organization in the country, as well as its work in drafting and helping to pass groundbreaking reform legislation to decrease the chance that innocence Ohioans will be wrongfully convicted in the future.

The Spirit of America award was named for Donald and Marian Spencer, called the “first couple of civil rights in Cincinnati.” Donald Spencer, who died several years ago, was the first African American to serve on the Cincinnati Park Board, the first African American broker on the Cincinnati Board of Realtors, and the first African American trustee of Ohio University. Marian Spencer integrated Coney Island many years ago, was the first African American president of the Woman’s City Club, and was the first African American woman to serve on Cincinnati City Council.

OIP Inaugural Breakfast A Success Thanks To Law Firm/Corporate Friends, Sponsors, and Supporters


The University of Cincinnati's Ohio Innocence Project would like to thank our Law Firm/Corporate Friends, Sponsors, and Supporters for a successful event!

On Tuesday, April 5, the Ohio Innocence Project Inaugural Breakfast saw more than 400 people in attendance. On behalf of the wrongfully convicted Ohio prisoners we have served and those we will continue to serve, we thank you! We are grateful to all of our sponsors. It is through their support that OIP can continue its meaningful work.

OIP Inaugural Breakfast Photo Gallery >>

 

Law Firm/Corporate Friends of OIP

Friends

Sponsors

OIP Sonsors

Supporters

 

Cors & Bassett LLC

Cuni, Ferguson & LeVay Co., LPA

Freking Myers & Reul LLC

Thompson Hine

Cincinnati Law’s Entrepreneurship Clinic Director Named U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Legal Champion” for 2016


Cincinnati, OH—Lew Goldfarb, the Director of Cincinnati Law’s Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic (ECDC), has been named the U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Legal Champion” of 2016 for the Columbus District. Goldfarb will be honored at the SBA’s annual banquet in Columbus, Ohio, on May 5, 2016.

GoldfarbGoldfarb came to Cincinnati Law to create and manage the school’s business clinic, launching ECDC in 2011. Since that time, it has become a coveted learning opportunity for law students and a vital resource for Cincinnati area businesses that cannot afford legal help. Over 120 students have received hands on training, representing 180 business—adding up to nearly $1,000,000 of free legal services to the local economy.

“I’m proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish in a little over five years,” says Goldfarb. “The significant impact of the ECDC can be attributed in large part to community involvement and collaboration, including involvement of local lawyers who graciously volunteer to supervise students and collaborations with local business accelerators and incubators like The Brandery, Mortar Cincinnati, Bad Girl Ventures, Hamilton County Business Center, and First Batch. By working together, we can make a big difference in this community”.

Regarding his designation as the SBA’s “Legal Champion”, Goldfarb says that he will accept the award on behalf of many people — “the many students who’ve staffed the clinic over the years; the volunteers who’ve assisted along the way; the ECDC’s office manager, Lori Strait, who oversees the day-to-day operations of the ECDC office; the community partners who trust us enough to work with them and their companies; and, importantly, the aspiring entrepreneurs in the Cincinnati area who are risking a lot to pursue their dreams and to make Cincinnati a better place for all of us.”

 

Cincinnati Law Posts Highest Pass Rate for February Ohio Bar


Cincinnati Law’s February 2016 Ohio Bar Exam pass rate is the highest rate in the state.

Cincinnati, OH—Today, the results are in for the most recent examination and Cincinnati Law, ranked a top 50 public law school in the nation by US News & World Report, recorded  a 76% overall rate, the highest overall passage rate out of the nine Ohio schools for the February 2016 bar exam!

The law school’s passage rate is more than 15 percent higher than the statewide average of 57 percent for overall test takers. In addition, graduates taking the bar exam for the second  time passed at an 88 percent rate, placing us first among Ohio law schools which averaged a 59 percent second time pass rate.

“I am delighted with the success that our students achieved on the February Ohio bar exam. It's a tribute to their hard work and that of the faculty and staff who do such a wonderful job teaching them,” said Jennifer S. Bard, Dean and Nippert Professor of Law at Cincinnati Law.

Applicants who successfully passed the examination and who satisfied all of the Supreme Court of Ohio’s other requirements will be sworn in during a special session of the Supreme Court of Ohio on Monday, May 2 at 2:00 p.m. at the Palace Theatre in Columbus, OH.

Additional News About Cincinnati Law
Cincinnati Law Reports Strong Bar Passage Results (July 2015 exam)
Best Value Law School

Experience of a Lifetime: Second-Year Law Student Ariel Guggisberg Helps Secure Prisoner’s Release


Law student helps write petition that leads to prisoner’s sentence commutation.

Cincinnati, OH—President Barack Obama’s recent commutation of 61 federal prisoners has a Cincinnati Law connection: second-year student Ariel Guggisberg helped draft the clemency petition for one of the prisoners whose sentence was commuted. “It feels like we really changed a person’s life,” she said.

 

The clemency petition was made possible under the umbrella of Clemency Project 2014, a working group of attorneys and advocates who provide pro bono assistance to federal prisoners who would likely have received a shorter sentence if sentenced today. Participants include federal defenders, the American Civil Liberties Union, Families Against Mandatory Minimums, the American Bar Association, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, more than 70 of the nation’s largest and most prestigious law firms, 500 small firms and solo practitioners, and 30 law schools and clinics. The project was developed after former Deputy Attorney General James Cole appealed to the legal profession to provide free assistance to help identify eligible prisoners and assist them in preparation of clemency petitions.

The Clemency Project 2014 reviews requests from a prisoner who has served 10 years and does not have an obviously disqualifying feature (ex. a crime of violence). The prisoner is assigned an attorney, who requests permission to review documents in his/her case to determine if other criteria are met. If the prisoner is qualified, the individual is assisted by a lawyer to help fill out and file a clemency petition. That’s where Guggisberg came in.

As part of her summer internship at firm Pinales Stachler last year, Guggisberg—under the direction of her supervising attorney Candace Crouse—was charged with helping to draft the petition for her client Michael Morris. (The firm was assigned two cases.) “I thought it was so much fun over last summer,” she said, “finding ways to argue how our client would be sentenced differently today—such as ‘the old laws required mandatory outlandish sentences,’ ‘the sentencing laws differ today,’ and ‘our client has accepted responsibility and learned from his experience.’

“We had to show he’s been rehabilitated and that he can contribute to society.”

After the petition was written, it was submitted to the Office of the Pardon Attorney, where the US Pardon Attorney makes final recommendations to the President. Then they wait to hear.

President Obama’s commutations are part of a larger effort calling for changes to sentencing laws. Most of the recipients “are low-level drug offenders whose sentences would have been shorter if they were convicted under today’s laws,” wrote President Obama in a Facebook posting. He went on to describe pardons and communications as ways “to show people what a second chance can look like.”

Guggisberg and her colleagues at the firm had the pleasure and privilege of breaking the exciting news to their client. She described it as an “incredibly rewarding experience.” Mr. Morris, who is in Texas, will live with his family to reintegrate into society, beginning his new life in July when he and the others are officially released.

What did she learn from this experience? Guggisberg shared that she was impressed and encouraged by watching her colleagues, daily, do everything they can for clients. “It was beautiful to see. I learned that to be successful in criminal defense, you have to have thick skin and relentless hope in humanity.”

Upon graduation next year, Guggisberg plans to focus her career in healthcare law.

Marianna Bettman, Law Professor and Alumnae, Receives University’s Distinguished Teaching Award


Professor Emerita of Practice Marianna Bettman received the University of Cincinnati Distinguished Teaching Professor Award on Tuesday, April 19, 2016.

Marianna BetmanCincinnati, OH—Congratulations to Cincinnati Law graduate and Professor Emerita of Practice Marianna Brown Bettman who received the University of Cincinnati’s Distinguished Teaching Professor Award. The award was presented at the university’s annual Faculty Awards Celebration, presided over by President Santa Ono, Provost Beverly Davenport, and the Faculty Senate.

"We are all exceptionally glad of the recognition Professor Bettman is receiving for being an exceptional educator. She has had a positive influence on the practice of law in Ohio and beyond through the hundreds of students she has taught. I look forward to her continued association with the law school even as she enjoys the much deserved freedom of retirement," said Jennifer S. Bard, Dean and Nippert Professor of Law at Cincinnati Law.

Professor Bettman started her professional career working in community development during the late 60’s, speaking to community members about school desegregation. Recognizing the role legal solutions could play to address racial injustice, she determined that her next career step would be law school at the university. While there, she excelled at school, winning the Constitutional Law Prize and becoming the first woman to be awarded first prize in Trial Advocacy.

After graduation in 1977, Professor Bettman began working in private practice. From there, she was elected Judge, First District Court of Appeals—the first woman elected to this position. She developed an expertise in separation of powers, state constitutional law, and the Ohio judicial system. After six years on the bench, the opportunity arose to join academia, leading her to College of Law in 1999; she remained at the school until recently. Her mastery of material and the high expectations set for students is legendary. Students, in turn, thrived under her style. Noted one, “Professor Bettman keeps us on our toes. You must be well-prepared at all times because you are called on every class!” In addition to teaching, she directed the Judge-In-Residence and Judicial Extern programs.

Professor Bettman is the recipient of numerous awards. They include the following: The Goldman Prize for Excellence in Teaching (2005, 2011, 2014), the Excellence in Education Award (Ohio Magazine, 2011), Cincinnati Attorney of the Year (Jewish National Fund, Judge Carl B. Rubin Legal Society, 2010), the Foot Soldiers in the Sand Award (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People-National Chapter, 2008), the A.B. “Dolly” Cohen Award for Excellence in Teaching (University of Cincinnati, 2008), the Nettie Cronies Lutes Award (Ohio State Bar Association, 2008), the University of Cincinnati Law Alumni Association Distinguished Alumna Award (2001), the Women’s Studies Distinguished Alumna Award (University of Cincinnati, 1998), the YWCA Career Woman of Achievement (1994), and many more. She authors the well-respected blog Legally Speaking Ohio and the monthly newspaper column Legally Speaking for the American Israelite, in addition to lecturing at numerous continuing legal education seminars, including an annual presentation at the Ohio Judicial Conference. Professor Bettman retired from teaching in December 2015. However, she is still committed to the law school and the education and training of future generations of attorneys.