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Eden Thompson Recognized as Next Generation Leader by the American Constitution Society


ACS Group PictureRecent graduate Eden Thompson was chosen through a nationwide contest to be a Next Generation Leader by the ACS.

Cincinnati, OH- “I’ve always had an interest in the humanities, and helping people,” said Thompson. “I have just always had a general interest in the law.”

Eden Thompson, third-year College of Law student and president of UC’s chapter of the American Constitution society, was recently selected to be a Next Generation Leader by the American Constitution Society (ACS) national body. This selection will grant her unique networking opportunities, including future involvement in ACS sponsored events and other resources to facilitate her future in law. Thompson was one of the 28 students selected by the ACS national body.

“I got involved with ACS my first year, as a 1L representative. The next year I became secretary, and by the third year I was president,” said Thompson. “I applied for the Next Generation Leader program, which identifies upcoming law school graduates who have demonstrated special leadership in their work with the ACS student chapters.”

Eden ThomsonInitially studying political science and history at Miami University, Thompson’s love for law sparked in her undergraduate studies during her constitutional law class. Now, her acknowledgement by the ACS serves as a reminder to continue to raise important questions regarding constitutional interpretation to improve the lives of all people. With a clerkship lined up after graduation, her future already seems to be reaching new heights.

“This clerkship is my dream job to start out with,” said Thompson. “But my dream job has always been in litigation - either working for a law firm or getting a job in the federal government.”

As Next Generation Leader, Thompson plans to continue her involvement with ACS in networking with the national body to plan events, debates, and discussions along with her exclusive access to the many resources and large networking team available.

About the American Constitution Society
The American Constitution Society believes that law should be a force to improve the lives of all people. ACS works for positive change by shaping debate on vitally important legal and constitutional issues through development and promotion of high-impact ideas to opinion leaders and the media; by building networks of lawyers, law students, judges and policymakers dedicated to those ideas; and by countering the activist conservative legal movement that has sought to erode our enduring constitutional values. With over 200 student and lawyer chapters in 48 states, ACS offers a platform for discussion on the issues of the day, as well as provide opportunities for networking, mentoring, and organizing.

About The Next Generation Leader Program
In 2007, the American Constitution Society launched its Next Generation Leaders (NGL) program, which identifies and provides support to recent and forthcoming law school graduates who have demonstrated special leadership in their work with ACS’s student chapters, and who have the interest, skills and ability to remain vital members of the ACS community for years to come. NGL applicants undergo a competitive application process. Each year, 20-25 students are selected as NGLs, and one NGL is selected to serve a 2-year term as a student member of ACS’s Board.

By: Kyler Davis, communication intern
Publication Date: June 1, 2017

Connected: The Unique Ties of Cincinnati’s Mayoral Race


Three Alumni for Mayor Forecasting election outcomes can be tricky business, but here’s one prediction guaranteed to come true: The next mayor of Cincinnati will have strong ties to UC Law.
That’s because among the three leading candidates in 2017’s mayoral race, two are UC Law graduates, and one cofounded a major UC Law initiative.

Incumbent John Cranley, who’s running for a second term as mayor, helped start the Ohio Innocence Project at UC Law in 2003, serving as administrative director until 2006. Candidate Yvette Simpson, currently in her second term as a city councilwoman, received her JD at UC in 2004. Former candidate Rob Richardson Jr., who recently completed a nine-year stint on UC’s Board of Trustees, graduated from UC Law in 2005.

Cranley, Richardson, and Simpson faced off in a primary election on May 2. The top two vote-getters—Cranley and Simpson—will now compete in the Nov. 7 general election.

Besides their UC Law connection, the three mayoral candidates shared many other things in common. They’re all lawyers, Democrats, and natives of Cincinnati. They also hold similar views on core civic issues, such as improving public transit, helping families get out of poverty, and partnering with regional institutions such as the University of Cincinnati. Yet each followed a unique path to UC Law, and eventually to this three-way race for mayor.

Rob Richardson
Robert RichardsonGoing to UC might have seemed like a no-brainer for Richardson, whose parents, aunt, and sisters all attended the school. But his struggles with learning disabilities as a young student made the path to higher education seem less than certain.

“I wasn't a kid that naturally got school. I struggled pretty early on,” he recalled. “Because of that, and because I was probably bored by school, I didn't do as well taking the tests. That pretty much ruled out college for me.” One conversation with a teacher particularly discouraged Richardson as an eighth-grade student. “I told her I wanted to prepare for college. She told me, ‘Why? You’re not going to do that. You’re going to fail.’ That's a crushing conversation to have.”

Fortunately, Richardson’s mother countered his teacher’s message with these words of encouragement for her son: “People are going to have lower expectations of you. Some because you're an African American man, too. Don't let yourself be defined by anybody's narrow expectations. You define yourself for yourself, by yourself.”

Richardson eventually studied electrical engineering at UC, earning his B.S. degree in 2002. At that point, he knew he didn’t want to pursue a career as an engineer, though he had learned a great deal about solving problems. He decided law school was his next logical step, because “legal training teaches you how to identify problems, how to look at them from multiple sides,” he explained. “If you're going to be in public office, it helps to understand how policy, how the law works, and then you can change it.”

Soon after earning his JD, Richardson was appointed to the UC Board of Trustees, where he recently led the search for the 30th President, Dr. Neville Pinto, and advocated for systemic, top-down reforms to UC police policy following the killing of Samuel Dubose. Currently, he’s a marketing construction representative, and serves as Of Counsel with the law firm Branstetter, Stranch & Jennings, specializing in labor and employment and securities litigation

In his first run for political office, Richardson hoped to take a fresh approach to governing the city. “We know that the best ideas often come from the people and places that have been ignored by the power brokers in City Hall,” he said. “It’s our responsibility, as leaders in our city, to be stewards and partners in innovation, inclusion, and creativity.”

Yvette Simpson
Yvette SimpsonSimpson’s journey began at the age of eight, when she pulled a book from the library shelf. Of all the titles in the “when I grow up” series, she chose the one about growing up to be a lawyer. Pictured on the cover, she recalled, was a man arguing his case before a judge. “And I said: ‘That’s gonna be me, except I’ll be wearing a skirt.’”

Simpson’s grandmother and other mentors encouraged her to stick with her dream, even as the young girl’s family struggled to make ends meet and many friends and family members dropped out of school or fell prey to criminal activity. She ended up with a full scholarship to Miami University, where she became the first in her family to graduate from college.

She made her younger self “very proud” by earning her law degree at UC. As a student, Simpson co-chaired the Student Legal Education Committee, was an executive member of the Moot Court board (and was inducted to the Order of the Barristers), served on the honor council, was a senior articles editor for the Human Rights Quarterly, and worked as an associate with both Baker & Hostetler LLP and Frost Brown Todd LLC.

Having gotten “a taste of leadership and involvement” at UC, Simpson said, “I loved it.” Just a few years later, in 2011, she was elected to City Council. Now she hopes to become the first African-American woman mayor in the city's history.

John Cranley
John CranleyThe classic novel that inspired Cranley to become a lawyer, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, centers around an attorney who helps free an innocent man. Years later, while working as a lawyer and serving on Cincinnati City Council, Cranley wanted to bring that kind of legal heroism to Cincinnati.

“I’d seen these Innocence Projects pop up in other states and I saw that there was none in Ohio and it would be great for UC,” Cranley said. He and his friend Professor Mark Godsey founded the Ohio Innocence Project at UC Law. Cranley ran the organization for its first few years. In one case, he successfully argued before the Ohio Court of Appeals, Fifth Appellate District to overturn Christopher Lee Bennett’s conviction of aggravated vehicular homicide.

Today, OIP is known as one of the most active and successful Innocence Projects in the world, and to date has secured the release of 25 individuals on grounds of innocence who together served more than 450 years in prison for crimes they did not commit.

“It’s an amazing success story,” Cranley said. “There’s no question that it gets back to the tradition of wanting to see the world better and to deal with injustices and build a more just society.” He took office as mayor of Cincinnati in December 2013, and hopes to be re-elected for a second term this fall.

By: Susan Wenner Jackson
Published: June 1, 2017

KMK Attorneys Named Leaders in their Fields


The following KMK Law attorneys have been selected for inclusion as “Leaders in Their Fields” in the 2016 edition of Chambers USA: America’s Leading Business Lawyers.

Jim BurkeJim Burke, 1978

Joe CallowJoe Callow, 1993

Bob ColettiBob Coletti, 1982

Mike ScheierMike Scheier, 1991

Read the complete press release here.

Professor and Dean of Academic Affairs Bradford Mank was quoted in the article, "High Court Won’t Hear Dispute Challenging FDA Over J&J Drug."


Professor and Dean of Academic Affairs Bradford Mank was quoted in the blog, "When Third Parties Can Sue Government Remains Murky."


Professor Janet Moore was acknowledged as being in the top 10% of Authors on SSRN by total new downloads within the last 12 months


Professors and OIP Attorneys Donald Caster and Brian Howe's article, "Taking a Mulligan: The Special Challenges of Narrative Creation in the Post-Conviction Context" was published in print in 76 Md. L. Rev. 770 (2017).


Cincinnati Law Celebrates its 184th Hooding


Cincinnati Law celebrated the accomplishments of its graduates on May 13, 2017. Led by Interim Dean Verna Williams, 84 degrees were conferred, including 14 LLM degrees. Take a look at a few pictures from the ceremony and celebration.

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A Message from Verna Williams, Interim Dean


Greetings!

As the College of Law’s Interim Dean, I’m focused on our future, which is bright.  We continue to make strides in job placement, bar passage and making a difference.  In fact, as I write this, we have just graduated a brand new class of lawyers, who leave us with experience helping local entrepreneurs and businesses, representing survivors of domestic violence, and freeing wrongly convicted persons—most recently Evin King, who served 23 years for a murder he didn’t commit. 

This year’s admissions season is promising; applications were up and we are on our way to recruiting another crop of well credentialed and highly motivated students. 

We remain Cincinnati proud and Cincinnati strong. 

Thank you for your continued support of the College of Law. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me. 

Best regards,
Verna Williams
Interim Dean

Michael Solimine Awarded 2017 Provost Faculty Career Award


Cincinnati, OH—In a career spanning three decades, Michael E. Solimine, JD, has built a firm career defined by a constant devotion to teaching, research and serving the academic and professional communities.

Over the course of his career he has developed a remarkable reputation as a researcher in the field of law, earning the distinction of being one of the most cited civil procedure professors in the United States for the last half decade. His work has seen publication across more than 70 law review articles, book chapters and book reviews.

His scholarship has been influential in the nation’s courts, with his works having been cited by Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg for a Supreme Court of the United States case. As a prominent figure in the College of Law, his colleagues and students have taken note of his constant professionalism, kindness and his role as a champion for the college’s core values of collegiality, due process and transparency.

Holding the title of Donald P. Klekamp Professor of Law, he has been known to his students as a professor who can translate “legalese into English” as he has transformed seemingly abstract concepts into comprehensible lessons.

He has served as a valuable mentor for the legal professionals under his tutelage, with his immense knowledge of all forms of federal courts and civil procedure making him an invaluable research source for his many students. In addition to his research and teaching service, he has shown a strong commitment to serving his community, helping newer faculty members as a key figure on the RPT committee and multiple decanal review boards and appearing as a consistent staple of the Faculty Senate.

Congratulations to Professor Michael Solimine!