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Abigail Horn ’13 Transitions to 2L Year and Life Without Her Pet Pig


For virtually every law student, past and present, ‘2L’ year is not nearly as big of an adjustment than the often dreaded first year of law school. In fact, for second-year student Abigail Horn, the biggest change between this year and last might be going from having a pet pig to a puppy.

Horn currently has a schnauzer/poodle named Louis. She spent much of last year, however, balancing her 1L classes and studies with taking care of Coco, a “teacup pig.”

The Cincinnati native has always loved animals, and she and her brothers grew up with dogs. When she moved in with a fellow law student last year, it was her idea to get a pet. However, the condo owner did not allow her to have a dog, though she was told a cat would be fine.

“I am allergic to cats so I asked him about a teacup pig. He said it was fine, so I went for it,” Horn said. “My roommate was all for it, and we had lots of fun while Coco was with us.”

Horn bought Coco from a breeder in Texas, and the pig arrived in Cincinnati via airplane last August before school started, she said. “She was almost 3 months when I got her and she was smaller than a toaster!” Horn laughed.

Coco was like any other pet for Horn, who said she fed her three times a day, took her outside for air and exercise, and occasionally took the pig to the veterinarian’s office.

Not surprisingly, Horn had to devote a lot of time to taking care of Coco – which she does with her puppy now as well. “When you have a pet, you can’t be gone all day and leave them alone – it’s inhumane,” Horn said. “To accommodate this I do my homework at home whenever possible and only come to the Law building for classes.”

Just as Horn’s dog, Louis, likes to eat the paper from her textbooks, Coco did as well. But more than that, Horn said Coco “ate more than any other animal I have seen,” fitting the pig stereotype. Horn was told that Coco would stay around 40 pounds at maturity, but before long the pig hit 100 pounds.

“The breeder misinformed me and because of Coco’s size, I felt it was not fair to her to make her live in such a small space,” Horn said. “Therefore, I sent her to a petting farm in Lebanon (Ohio). … I know she will make a lot of people happy and have a fun life with the other pigs.”

Although Horn has only visited Coco once, she hopes to see her old pet every one to two months, she said. Now, however, she is focused on 2L year and enjoying her time with her puppy.

Horn, who interned this summer at the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas for Judge Robert P. Ruehlman, recently joined the College of Law’s Human Rights Quarterly.

She is hoping to find a job after law school that will allow her to “help those who are disabled or underrepresented.” Horn said she would also be interested in finding a position in international law, environmental law or – surprise – animal rights law.

By Jordan Cohen, ‘13