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1988 Goldman Prize for Excellence in Teaching

This year's Goldman Committee has chosen Professors Gordon Christenson, Katherine Goldwasser, and John Murphy as recipients of the 1988 Goldman Award. The student members of the committee were Cynthia Fazio, Catherine Flaherty, Lisa Hathaway, and John O'Connor. The committee worked hard in the selection process, consulting the student body, meeting with me [Dean Tom Gerety], and deliberating carefully on their choices. They composed the following statements to explain their selections.

"Professor Gordon Christenson embodies the necessary elements which produce excellence in teaching: contributions to legal research, significant practical experience on the national and international levels, fair and forward-looking law school administration, and a sincere belief in the capacity of the law student to maintain the noblest of professional values while breaking new ground in problem-solving. His stimulating performance in the classroom is backed up by his consistent willingness to meet and counsel the many who seek his reasoned and reasonable advice. The Committee salutes Professor Christenson not only for his tireless classroom efforts but also for his continuing faith in us."

"Enthusiasm for the law both in and out of the classroom in just one of Professor Kathy Goldwasser's characteristics. She demonstrates her concern that students absorb both the substantive and the practical components of the law through her teaching methods. Students are pushed to their limits without making them feel intimidated or forced into performing. Her energy is also evident beyond the classroom setting in her willingness to assist students, her constant availability, and her generosity to the College of Law. Professor Goldwasser's natural ability and positive attitude are presented through her dynamic efforts to teach each and every class and in her participation in committees and activities."

"Professor John Murphy, champion of alternative dispute resolution, displays teaching excellence in both the traditional law school Socratic teaching style and in skills oriented courses. In the traditional law school class, Professor Murphy presses students to go beyond the recitation of reported decisions. He emphasized the strategic decisions lawyers make before they ever reach the courtroom. This emphasis on practical lawyering is further emphasized in Professor Murphy's skill oriented courses. Professor Murphy stresses that a lawyer advocates his client's interest by simulating real world experience through his role playing courses involving mediation and "ah-bitration." The Goldman Committee would like to award Professor Murphy the Goldman Prize in recognitiion of his excellence in teaching."