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Events

Symposia

As part of its mission as an educational organization, the Weaver Institute sponsors a wide variety of conferences, symposia and lectures. View highlights and photos from past symposia.

 

Speaker Series 

In the Weaver Institute Speakers Series, a diverse group of law school faculty members, mental health practitioners, and judges share their ideas, research, and writing with the local and University community. Among these meetings are monthly dinner get-togethers with faculty and fellows from the Department of Psychiatry at the College of Medicine.

2015-2016

"Danger and Disorder: Violence and Mental Illness"
John Monahan, John S. Shannon Distinguished Professor of Law, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia.

"A Discussion of the Biomarkers for Violence and Criminality: The Hopes and Expectations for the Future"
James Blair, Chief of the Affective Neuroscience Unite at the National Institute of Mental Health.

 

2014-2015

Neuroscience and the Law” fall semester. Ongoing

"The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime"
Adrian Raine, Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, and Visiting Fellow, University of Cambridge. (Read more)

 

2013-2014

Brown Bag Series: “Tools for judges to use to determine whether a maltreated child or juvenile defendant has a significant traumatic history
James Clark, national expert in Forensic Mental Health, Director, School of Social Work, University of Cincinnati

Echoes of War: The Combat Veteran in the Criminal Justice System
Brockton Hunter, CLE credit

Brown Bag Series
Professor Steven Howe, Professor of Psychology at UC (Read more)

 

2012-2013

Brown Bag series: “Severe Mental Illness, Cognitive Impairments, and the Law
Paula Shear, PhD. Professor of Clinical Psychology, Psychiatry, and Neurology; Director of Clinical Training and the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program, University of Cincinnati. (Read more)

“False Confessions and the Daubert Decision
Scott Bresler, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry; Clinical Director of the Risk Management Center in the Division of Forensic Psychiatry; Director of Inpatient Psychology at University Hospital.

Urban Health, Human Rights, and the Underserved
Rosalyn Stewart, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Associate Director, Med-Peds Urban Health Residency and Program, Associate Track Director, Osler Urban Health Primary Care Residency Program, Johns Hopkins University.

Brown Bag Series: “The Effects of Childhood Maltreatment and Sex Abuse
Jennie Noll, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of Research in Behavioral Medicine & Clinical Psychology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Read more)

"Panel Discussion: Are Mass Shooters Mentally Ill and What Can We Do About Them?"
Jim Hunt, Weaver Center Co-Director (Read more)

Brown Bag Series: "Medical Rights, Mental Illness, and the Urban Environment"
Rosalyn Stewart, Associate Director of the Urban Health Program, Johns Hopkins. (Read more)

Brown Bag Series: "The Expert Witness and the Art of Shooting Dice"
Schott Bresler, Clinical Director of the Risk Management Center, Division of Forensic Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati and Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati (Read more)

 

Workshops

The Weaver Institute also offers workshops and lectures in collaboration with other university centers and divisions, such as the College of Law’s Center for Practice and the UC College of Medicine.

2016-2017

Workshop: presentations at the Forensic Psychiatry Journal Club by Weaver Fellows

December 2011

"The Psyche at Work: Help for Lawyers’ Worries About Employee Mental Disorders, Trauma, and Violence"
This one day CLE workshop focuses on what lawyers can learn from psychiatrists regarding mental health issues in the workplace. (Read more)

December 2009

"Client Troubles? It's Time for Psychiatric Advice"
Lawyers can learn much from psychiatrists about working with clients who seem unable or unwilling to listen to reason. (Read more)