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William Howard Taft Lecture Focuses on Federalism as a Constitutional Principle


Tuesday, October 28, 2014
12:15 pm
University of Cincinnati College of Law- Room 114

CLE: Application for 1 hour of general CLE has been submitted to Ohio and Kentucky, and approval is expected.

Webcast: 2014 Lecture with Prof. Young

 

Federalism as a Constitutional Principle

Federalism may be the most distinctive aspect of American constitutionalism.  Unlike many constitutional principles, federalism is part of the everyday experience of all Americans.  Many people have never been prosecuted for a crime, had a desire to protest government action, or owned a gun, but virtually every one of us has lived in a state, voted in a state or local election, and noted the changes—sometimes subtle, sometimes not—that confront us when we cross state lines.  Yet federalism remains relatively unappreciated by most Americans and incompletely understood even by constitutional lawyers.  This lecture examines the reasons to value and enforce federalism as a constitutional principle, emphasizing the role of federalism in the constitutional system of checks and balances.  But federalism cannot survive unless people actually care about their states, and this lecture also explores whether, in fact, they still do.

 

About the Speaker

Ernest A. Young, the Alston & Bird Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law, will present the 2014 William Howard Taft Lecture on Constitutional Law, October 28, 2014 at 12:15 p.m. This event will be held in Room 114; application for 1 hr/CLE has been submitted to Ohio and Kentucky; approval is expected. In this lecture Professor Young will examine the reasons to value and enforce federalism as a constitutional principle, emphasizing the role of federalism in the constitutional system of checks and balances.